The bluest eye essay questions

The narrator relates events from Pauline's early life, her marriage, and how she became a maid for an affluent, white family. Morrison designs The Bluest Eye to make us sympathize with even the most violent and hurtful characters, which means that this question has many possible answers.

Which narrative point of view do you think is most central to the novel and why? What is his definition of what a family should be?

The Bluest Eye

Through the interior monologues, Morrison uses the layout of the novel itself to convey part of the content. A case can be made for the centrality of any of the three narrators listed above. Years later, in Lorain, a drunken Cholly staggers into his kitchen, and overcome with lust, brutally rapes and impregnates Pecola.

Inspired by a conversation Morrison once had with an elementary school classmate who wished for blue eyes, the novel poignantly shows the psychological devastation of a young black girl, Pecola Breedlove, who searches for love and acceptance in a world that denies and devalues people of her own race.

Maureen Peal was portrayed The bluest eye essay questions beautiful because she was different. What do these people dream for, and what will it take to make them happy?

The following entry presents criticism on Morrison's novel The Bluest Eye through Commentators later claimed that they neglected the work because Morrison was unknown at the time.

Claudia is yet another candidate for the most sympathetic character, simply because we experience so much of the story from her point of view and she is the one who helps us makes sense of it all.

Pecola becomes the idea of madness, caused by the myth of blue-eyed beauty. Is it significant that each relationship involves animals? In a sense, Pecola becomes the African American community's scapegoat for its own fears and feelings of unworthiness.

If so, which one, and why? American society tells Pecola happy, white, middle-class families are better than hopeless, black, working-class families. In addition, some have examined the influence of environment on the novel's characters, identifying stylistic affinities with literary naturalism.

The Bluest Eye

Even the adults admired the blue eyes, as shown when Mrs. The characters do experience direct oppression, but more routinely they are subject to an internalized set of values that creates its own cycle of victimization within families and the neighborhood.

Victimized in different degrees by media messages—from movies and books to advertising and merchandise—that degrade their appearance, nearly every black character in the novel—both male and female—internalizes a desire for the white cultural standard of beauty.

Loss of innocence does not concern them. Interspersed throughout the text are fragments in the voice of an omniscient narrator that discuss Pecola's obsessive desire for blue eyes and her parents, Pauline and Cholly; each fragment is introduced with different lines from the Dick-and-Jane primer.

The rest of The Bluest Eye divides into four separate time sequences, each named for a season of the year and each narrated by Claudia.

This desire is especially strong in Pecola, who believes that blue eyes will make her beautiful and lovable. All men are supposed to be ripped, hairless and skinny and all women are supposed to be tall, skinny, and have long legs.

During her pregnancy, she goes to motion pictures, where she succumbs to her earlier romantic ideas and learns the American ideal of beauty as she watches Clark Gable and Jean Harlow.

A case can be made for the centrality of any of the three narrators listed above. Major Themes In The Bluest Eye, the opening excerpt from the Dick-and-Jane primer juxtaposed with the experiences of African American characters immediately sets the tone for Morrison's examination of a young black girl's growing self-hatred: Others have considered the ways The Bluest Eye alludes to earlier black writings in order to express the traditionally silenced female point of view and uses conventional grotesque imagery as a vehicle for social protest.

Discuss the significance of no marigolds blooming in the fall of Inspired by a conversation Morrison once had with an elementary school classmate who wished for blue eyes, the novel poignantly shows the psychological devastation of a young black girl, Pecola Breedlove, who searches for love and acceptance in a world that denies and devalues people of her own race.

Support your answer with examples from the text. He flees to Macon, Georgia, in search of his father who is miserably mean and wants nothing to do with his son.

She would always saunter around with a sad, grim look on her face, and rarely talked to anyone. Is she treated worse by one of these characters than the other?

The Bluest Eye Essays (Examples)

In the midst of the hostilities, Pecola constantly prays for blue eyes, believing that if she only had blue eyes, life would be better. At the same time, she is comparatively more confident and secure than Pecola, so she can articulate things that Pecola cannot.

Many critics have approached the novel in the context of the rise of African American writers, assigning significance to their revision of American history with their own cultural materials and folk traditions. High quality and no plagiarism guarantee! Does knowing about his upbringing affect your reactions when he rapes Pecola?

As an adult, Claudia recalls incidents from late when she was nine years old living in Lorain, Ohio, with her poor but loving parents and her ten-year-old sister, Frieda. Geraldine becomes the idea of a sort of class brutality.The Bluest Eye Essay. By Lauren Bradshaw.

You can order a custom essay, term paper, research paper, thesis or dissertation on The Bluest Eye topics at our professional custom essay writing service which provides students with custom papers written by highly qualified academic writers.

High quality and no plagiarism guarantee! Join Now Log in Home Literature Essays Bluest Eye Bluest Eye Essays The Music and Silence of The Bluest Eye Jennifer DeLeo Bluest Eye. Among Toni Morrison's works, "images of music pervade her work, but so also does a musical quality of language, a sound and rhythm that permeate and radiate in every novel" (Rigney 8).

The Bluest Eye Homework Help Questions. What is the significance of the four parts of the novel and their correlation with the four The seasons of the year operate symbolically in the novel.

Sep 14,  · Which is a greater threat to the children in The Bluest Eye: racism or sexism? 3. At the end of the novel, Claudia questions her own right or ability to tell the truth about Pecola’s experience. The Bluest Eye Toni Morrison (Born Chloe Anthony Wofford) American novelist, nonfiction writer, essayist, playwright, and children's writer.

The following entry presents criticism on Morrison's novel The Bluest Eye () through For further information on her life and complete works, see CLC, Volumes 4, 10, 22, 87, and The Bluest Eye Toni Morrison (Born Chloe Anthony Wofford) American novelist, nonfiction writer, essayist, playwright, and children's writer.

The following entry presents criticism on Morrison's.

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The bluest eye essay questions
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